Modified

Aug 13, 2015 to Sep 20, 2015

Sierra foothills artist Staria Stine will be presenting her work in this solo exhibition addressing the topic of our relationship with Nature and the current issues related to genetically modified organics (GMOs). Working closely with plants and the complex geometric systems found within their structures, this body of work calls attention to the precise, delicate and highly-informed design of edible plants and other organics.


She finds the issues of how we view, manipulate and often separate ourselves from Nature and its natural processes most interesting. This human tendency is the driving force of her inspiration. The utilization of scientific and engineering elements in current environmental shifts and food cultivation systems inspires Stine to address and question this dichotomy through her work. Known primarily for her highly-carved textural surfaces in clay, Stine works in both organic and man-made materials to further illustrate this relationship, offering the viewer an opportunity to investigate and question the nuances of this equation.


"As our evolution is increasingly dominated by technology and science, our connection with the natural environment has gradually become more divided, reformulating what we consider to be natural or synthetic. I am most intrigued by the synthetic intervention of agriculture and how we address issues of life and death. Our use of genetic modification in our food cultivation systems and chemical supplements and pharmaceuticals in our health systems is radically shifting our cultural ideals of what we consider food and health, respectively, to be.
The aspect in which these topics integrate through the Environment and Industry inspires me to address and question this dichotomy through my work. Working in both organic and man-made materials to further illustrate this relationship, I offer the viewer an opportunity to investigate and question the nuances of this equation.


In this body of work I am focusing specifically on the topic of genetically modified organics (GMOs) and how they have been incorporated into our contemporary applications. Genetic modification is a forced process, one that the natural world inevitably rejects, raising question to our ethical responsibilities and pointing to future societal costs. Working closely with plants and the complex geometric systems found within their structures, this body of work calls attention to the precise, delicate and highly-informed design of edible plants and the organics."

 

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